Scheriproct

Scheriproct can be used to treat a haemorrhoids and to relieve anal itching.

Can I get Scheriproct Online?

The Online Clinic can prescribe Scheriproct online after you complete a short consultation that will be reviewed by a doctor.

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What is Scheriproct?

Scheriproct is a combination medicine, containing two active medicines – prednisolone hexanoate that is a glucocorticoid steroid and reduces inflammation, and cinchocaine hydrochloride that is an anaesthetic that acts locally to relieve pain. Together these medicines relieve the inflammation (i.e., swelling, redness, itching, and pain) caused by haemorrhoids (also known as piles), and itching of your anus.

How to use Scheriproct

Scheriproct is available as an ointment or as suppositories. The quantity of prednisolone and cinchocaine is different in the two preparations. Your doctor will select the preparation suitable for your particular problem. Treatment should not be longer than 7 days. If you still require treatment, then tell your doctor that the problem has not cleared up.

Wash your hands both before and after administering either Scheriproct preparation. When using the ointment, firstly wash and dry the anal area. When used for the area around the anus, squeeze a pea-sized amount of ointment onto the finger and gently spread (but do not rub in) over the skin around the anus and just inside the anus. When used inside the anus, attach the applicator (nozzle) to the tube and fill the nozzle. Carefully insert the entire nozzle into the anus, squeeze the tube while withdrawing the nozzle. The applicator should then be washed with warm soapy water and rinsed thoroughly. Scheriproct ointment is usually administered twice daily, but may be used 3–4 times on day 1 for rapid symptom relief. The area covered with the ointment must not also be covered with a waterproof dressing.

When using the suppositories, firstly remove the foil cover (soft suppositories can be hardened by placing in cold water before removing the foil cover). The entire length of the suppository is pushed into the anus (you may find this easier if you squat down or stand with one foot on a chair seat). Scheriproct suppositories are usually administered once daily, preferably after passing stools, but may be used 2–3 times when starting treatment for relief of severe discomfort.

Applying too much or accidentally swallowing Scheriproct is unlikely to cause any harm. When forgetting to use it, apply Scheriproct as usual (do not use twice the amount) and continue treatment as instructed.

Who can use Scheriproct?

Adults and children can use Scheriproct. It should not be used by individuals who are allergic to prednisolone, cinchocaine, other local anaesthetics, or other ingredients in the product. Neither should you use this medicine if you have a viral infection, including. herpes, shingles and chicken-pox, or an untreated bacterial or fungal infection. You will likely be given an anti-infective medicine to use as well as Scheriproct if you have an infection of the skin around the anus or anus. Inform the doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, or planning to have a baby as there may be a risk to the baby's development.

Scheriproct is for short-term use only, because used over long periods of time increases the risk of side effects, such as reduced adrenal gland functioning and resistance to disease (particularly in infants and young) children, and skin thinning. Mention all the medicines that you are taking, as well as the medicines you have recently stopped or may be starting.

Scheriproct side effects

Rarely, there have been reports of allergic skin reactions. Skin thinning may occur if large doses of Scheriproct are used for too long.

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